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skaur enough votes to implement an austerity budget so now he's back to help john boehner secure enough votes versus the president to press for an austerity budget, is that right? >> yeah, that's correct, martin. it's interesting, there's a lot of criticism saying paul ryan's vision for an american budget was routinely rejected flat out by voters a little more than a week ago. so why will he have such an impact in terms of the fiscal cliff negotiations? and the reason is that paul ryan, despite the presidential loss, continues to be the ideological godfather of the current republican budget -- >> but, luke, he just got ripped to shreds. he just got pulverized in the election. in fact, so many of his ideas, he had to go quiet on because they were so deficient and attacked during the presidential campaign. yet there you are now telling our audience he's back and republicans have him as their -- one of their main stakeholders. >> he's very much still an important player within the house republican conference. so much so that speaker boehner when it came to having a daily meeting about the
boehner immediately saying he generally supportive of trying to close the loop holes. do you see that as raising taxes? >> what boehner said and in the republican position since republican we should reduce rates have economic growth many of which are put in by obama for the solyndra green-type energy programs. let's bring the rates down. boehner was clear he wanted increase revenues it is not a tax increase to put more americans at work. if our recovery was growing the rate reagans did more americans would be at work. in terms of raising revenue which boehner grew about. if you grew the economy at reagan levels instead of two percent and obama and french levels, just growing faster and do that for a decade, the federal government gets trillions in taxes. we could undo the damage by having higher growth. >> gretchen: that's the difference in ideology. raise it to 3#.9 percent x. replace the alternative minimum tax with the buffet and raise the state tax and long-term capitol gains from 15-20. where do you think that those four points will go in negotiations with the republicans? >
boehner wants a temporary deal that extends all the bush tax cuts and buys more time. democrats don't want to extend attach cuts at all even temporarily. we know going over the cliff would throw us into a recession but experts say if it's reversed within a couple weeks it wouldn't be catastrophic. if the two sides cut a deal referred to as the grand bargain, it's preferable in theory, but with democrats and republicans so far apart, it is unclear what we might have to sacrifice in order to get that bargain. third, the two sides could negotiate around the issue of taxes. this is a little more complicated, unclear how it might work. there would be some sort of trade-off and it seems unlikely. the fourth possible scenario, create a patch to get us through the start of the year, which is a short term extension of the status quo something republicans would like, because it extends the bush tax cuts. president obama did that once in 2010 and is not willing to do it again. finally, we could procrastinate with a little down payment sending the message we will get to it. it would be a small package
and the ongoing relationship with boehner and mcconnell because he's going to have to be a different kind of leader with them. he talked about it in the press conference a bit the other day. he needs to reach out to them the way he's reached out to people on staten island and dealt with the two governors, christie and cuomo, who are two pretty demanding guys as well. and based on their public and private comments have been very happy with the president's leadership and his government. >> i just wonder if it's fair to make a parallel when you look at the president's response to sandy which has had and continues to have just devastating effects on the economy for businesses and the reaction to the bp oil spill which seemed slow in coming because that was devastating as well to a different part of the country. >> he certainly was. he was very slow to respond to people in the gulf coast. >> in terms of appearances. >> i think things have changed, though, over the past couple years. and i suspect that, you know, even the president's closest allies will say that it was a very hard adjustment go
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)